Tuesday, December 24, 2019

How to Make Performance Reviews More Effective and Enjoyable

Performance reviews don’t have to be something to sweat about.


These conversations offer a valuable feedback loop for people to ask questions, identify needs, and drive professional growth.


Building Conversations that Count


Whether you’re conducting or participating in a review, here are a few strategies to make the most of your next review:


Share Facts and Document Goals


Before a review, make sure you are clear about what is expected.


Review job descriptions and jot down ways success has been achieved or where one person is being overloaded. Include measurable data (i.e., project output, sales goals achieved, etc.) that is understood by all participants. Link any examples (like improvement strategies or success stories) to the facts. Then, conclude by recording time-sensitive, measurable goals that are linked to the objectives discussed in the review.


Questions to Consider:


  • What’s working?

  • What’s not working?

  • What has been your greatest accomplishment or challenge this year?

  • Where do you feel there is room to improve?

  • What's something you don't think I see but should know?

Regularly Document Progress


To avoid the “dread” factor, intentionally calendar regular check-ins that are communicated in person or through e-mail.


While many yearly goals end up at the bottom of the drawer, monthly or quarterly updates make space for effective dialogue and regular course corrections. This relieves pressure from the yearly review while keeping everyone on the same page.


Questions to Consider:


  • In what areas are you delivering the best results?

  • What are the biggest challenges you face in your current position?

  • Where has your team been helping or hindering your work?

Build From Personal Strengths


While everyone has particular tasks to accomplish, each person has gifts that can positively impact the company in unique ways.


During reviews, ask this question: “What 20 percent of my contribution generates 80 percent of my impact at work?” Work together to clarify untapped potential and discuss how this could be optimized for greater results. If needed, seek extra support, resources, or an alteration of current responsibilities.


Questions to Consider:


  • Do you have everything needed to perform your job?

  • What are the main drivers for success in your position?

  • What skills do you have that could be used more effectively?

A Structure That Builds Success


Want to create a positive environment for good communication?


Structure your reviews around facts, goals, and strengths to make your company as productive as possible.

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